Kremlin Aide: Russia Could Change Position on Syria if Assad Cheats

Sergei Ivanov, chief of staff of the Presidential Administration, delivers a speech in Moscow, May 23, 2013.

There have been daily demonstrations since Golden Dawn has been accused of involvement in killing Tuesday of left-wing activist Pavlos Fissas More Featured Videos Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe’s Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player . Health Risks Fail to Deter Ethiopians from Eating Raw Meat Ethiopians continue to eat raw meat at family and festive occasions despite health risks that include exposure to tapeworms, salmonella and E-coli. Marthe van der Wolf reports for VOA from Addis Ababa on why the practice persists. Video Virginia Town Forced to Adapt to Rising Seas No one is far from the water in the port city of Norfolk, Virginia, where citizens are feeling the impact of climate change. At high tide and during storms, water floods the streets. Sea level is rising faster here than anywhere else on the U.S. east coast. As VOAs Rosanne Skirble reports, the city is learning to adapt to a warmer world. Video US Investigation Spotlights China’s Princelings The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is investigating JP Morgans Hong Kong office for hiring the children of high-level Chinese officials. Observers say the hiring of these so-called princelings is to open business opportunities in mainland China. But could the practice, which dates back almost two decades, also be considered bribery? Yinan Wang and Yi Chen look at the practice in a report voiced by Colin Lovett. Video All-American Banjo Has African Roots From folk songs like Oh Susannah to its starring role in Bluegrass festivals, the banjo seems to be a quintessentially homegrown American instrument.

Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013 | Posted: 11:10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013 Russia warns Ukraine against EU deal Sponsored Links The Associated Press YALTA, Ukraine A top Russian official on Saturday warned Ukraine against signing a landmark trade and cooperation agreement with the European Union, saying Moscow would retaliate with trade restrictions that could push this ex-Soviet republic toward default. Speaking at a conference in the Black Sea city of Yalta, Russian presidential adviser Sergei Glazyev dismissed the benefits of a planned free-trade deal between the EU and Ukraine as “mythology.” He warned that tariffs and trade checks that Russia would impose after the deal could cost Ukraine billions of dollars and result in a default. “Who will pay for Ukraine’s default, which will become inevitable?” Glazyev asked. “One has to be ready to pay for that.” Russia is opposing Kiev’s plans to sign a free-trade and political association agreement with the 28-member bloc in November, seeking instead to lure Kiev into a Moscow-led economic union. It upped the pressure on Ukraine over the summer by banning the products of a major confectionary maker in Russia and by temporarily halting some Ukrainian imports at its border, dealing a painful blow to Ukrainian business. Former Economy Minister and confectionary magnate Petro Poroshenko lashed out at Russia for banning his products from Russian stores in order to exert political pressure on Ukraine, saying Moscow had previously resorted to similar tactics when dealing with other dissenting former Soviet republics. “I am 100 percent sure that nobody either in this forum, nor in the world, would strongly believe that Georgian mineral water or Moldovan wine or Ukrainian chocolate or Lithuanian cheese or Belarusian milk products are really harmful for the health of the Russian consumer. This is simply not true,” Poroshenko said. EU officials have urged Kiev to implement key reforms and sign the EU deal in November, saying Ukraine belongs with the West. The key obstacle to the deal is the incarceration of former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, whose verdict the West has condemned as politically motivated and is pressing hard for her to be released in order for the deal to be signed. Polish Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski exhorted Ukraine to resist the Kremlin pressure and sign the agreement in November, citing Poland’s success in joining the bloc. “We’ve done it, so can you,” Sikorski said.