They found it on these 20 rural acres, where they raised a family and built a cabin. Now somewhat tumbledown and embraced by wildflowers and thistles, its only visitors this September afternoon are fluttering butterflies and one busload of Detroit tourists. Yet I found the modest Walls Historic Site a touching remembrance of the power of the Underground Railroad. It’s said that even civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks found solace at this place. “It’s nice to come here and say, oh, you reached the other side,” says Norma Sales of Detroit, one of a group of Michigan travelers on a two-day tour to see spots in southwest Ontario that make up the Canadian half of the freedom tale. Underground Railroad historical sites are plentiful in the U.S. and especially in Detroit, one of the busiest crossing points to freedom. But in Canada, you can see the other half of the story what happened to the estimated 30,000 people who crossed into southwest Ontario between 1834 and 1860. Black history is alive in Lakeshore, Amherstburg, Dresden, North Buxton and Windsor. Many fugitives who crossed in turn became key figures in the Underground Railroad. The lessons these sites impart to visitors? “Perseverance, hard work, doing the right thing and don’t give up,” says Stewart McMillin, a Detroit tour guidewho specializes in Underground Railroad tours, including sites in Canada.

CANADA STOCKS-TSX edges lower as market mulls over Fed stance

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bonneville Power Administration are leading the review of the treaty in consultation with other federal agencies, four Northwest states and more than a dozen tribes. U.S. regulators will send their final recommendation in December to the State Department, where the ultimate decision on whether to renegotiate rests. “The treaty has been a model of international water management,” said Steve Oliver of the Bonneville Power Administration, who is coordinating the effort for the U.S. entity. “And we feel like it is appropriate to review it at this time, and look at the potential to modernize it to create a win-win opportunity for regional ecosystem interests, hydropower interests and flood risk management.” Under the treaty, Canada stores water behind three major dams for flood control and to maximize hydropower generation. In exchange, the U.S. agreed to pay Canada $64 million for flood control for the life of the treaty – far less than the estimated damages that would have occurred with additional flooding – and to send electricity generated at downstream U.S. hydropower dams to Canada. As currently operated, the river is managed well for flood control, but the U.S. could study changes to river operations to boost water supplies in the summer if necessary, said Jim Barton of the U.S.

“The stronger the U.S. is, the better for us.” Six of the 10 main sectors on the index were up. The telecoms group climbed 0.9 percent. In the group, Telus Corp jumped 2.1 percent to C$34.58, and Rogers Communications Inc advanced 1.2 percent to C$44.26. Utilities gained 1.4 percent, and REITs added 0.6 percent. Financials, the index’s most heavily weighted sector, dropped 0.4 percent. Royal Bank of Canada, the country’s biggest lender, declined 0.1 percent to C$66.20. Manulife Financial Corp, an insurer, lost 2.4 percent to C$17.16. The materials sector, which includes mining stocks, fell 1 percent. Goldcorp Inc stumbled 4 percent to C$28.02, and Barrick Gold Corp was down 3.5 percent at C$19.94, brushing aside the jump in the gold price. Goldcorp had the biggest negative influence on the index.

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