Community Food group teaching healthy cooking

Chloe Scott and daughter Elspeth try some pitta bread pizzas and sweet potato. Picture: Toby Williams

18, 2013. After Tropical Storm Manuel destroyed bridges and roads, making it impossible to have supplies delivered to them, the residents of this small town have opted to make the 3 hour journey by foot, in order to get food and necessary supplies for their families. Previous AP/Alejandrino Gonzalez Twin hurricanes in Mexico Residents of Mochitlan, haul supplies up a hill on the outskirts of Chilpancingo, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. After Tropical Storm Manuel destroyed bridges and roads, making it impossible to have supplies delivered to them, the residents of this small town have opted to make the 3 hour journey by foot, in order to get food and necessary supplies for their families. Previous AP/Alejandrino Gonzalez Twin hurricanes in Mexico Residents of Mochitlan, carry supplies up a hill, as others come down to get supplies, on the outskirts of Chilpancingo, Mexico, Wednesday Sept. 18, 2013. After Tropical Storm Manuel destroyed bridges and roads, making it impossible to have supplies delivered to them, the residents of this small town have opted to make the 3 hour journey by foot, in order to get food and necessary supplies for their families. Previous AP/Eduardo Verdugo Twin hurricanes in Mexico People stand on the edge of a collapsed bridge as they wait to ferry their goods via a boat across the Papagayos River, south of Acapulco, near Lomas de Chapultepec, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. Previous AP/Eduardo Verdugo Twin hurricanes in Mexico People wade through waist-high water in a store’s parking, looking for valuables, south of Acapulco, in Punta Diamante, Mexico, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013. Previous AP/Alejandrino Gonzalez Twin hurricanes in Mexico People stand next to home collapsed into the Huacapa River overflowed due to heavy rains caused by Tropical Storm Manuel near the town of Petaquillas, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013.

The outside consultants found that to many television viewers, the network delivered little besides unexciting “dump and stir” cooking a meal. Other networks were starting to offer more exciting food programming. They presented Brooke with a graphic, the Food Network logo as a pie. It showed that Travel Channel, TLC, and the broadcast networks had bitten off portions of her market with shows shot on the road, real-life wedding tales, and other “reality” programming. The consultants titled the graphic “Nibbled to Death.” The authors of the study might as well have put Emeril’s face in the conclusions, a big red X marked over it. When you looked past the live band and the quick opening monologue, his two shows, Emeril Live and his lower-key half-hour weekend show, Essence of Emeril, were basic cooking shows. If Food Network wanted to grow, it was going to have to become less of the Emeril Network. But, Brooke, Susie, and other executives were not ready to let go yet. This was Emeril a surely something could be done. Brooke assigned the Emeril Live production team hundreds of thousands of dollars to update the set. They moved it to a new studio, added a Viking range, and cut out his monologue, which allowed him to head straight to the kitchen, where he was most comfortable and his energy was highest. Susie and her marketing team came up with a new overall network slogan that began appearing at commercial breaks: “Food Network: Way More Than Cooking.” For three years, as the Emeril Live audience continued to age, programs such as Alton Brown’s half-hour on the science of food, Good Eats; the breakthrough competition show Iron Chef America; and The Next Food Network Star started to thrive and attract younger viewers. Susie, like other Food Network executives, noticed the change. Then in 2007, a “Brand Lens Study” used focus groups inside and outside the network to distill the direction Food Network would have to take if it wanted to keep up with the more exciting programming emerging on other networks, especially Top Chef on Bravo. The report’s conclusions found many ways to say “Get out of the studio.” Brooke talked to Emeril that year, speaking with her characteristic directness.

Ralph Ellison

If Im being honest, I wasnt eating that well, she says. I was more likely to go to Greggs or Iceland than anywhere else and I probably was aware that my kids didnt have the best diet. I didnt do much in the kitchen and I think quite a lot of parents are in that situation. Now Im far more confident and experiment a bit more.The course has been really helpful in showing you how to make healthy choices, Ive learned a lot. The vouchers are great, but even when theyve run out Ive been sticking to it. A major survey conducted across Lothian recently found that while the vast majority consider themselves fit and healthy, in realiry, 60 per cent were overweight or obese. It led to claims that high-profile education campaigns, such as the drive to encourage the consumption of five pieces of fruit and vegetables a day, had not had an impact on the behaviour of the wider population. There is also growing concern over a widening health gap between those in who live in the richest and those who live in the poorest areas. But if the millions of pounds of public cash spent on television adverts and marketing consultants had failed, the city council-funded vouchers and Edinburgh Community Food classes appear to have hit home. Fadzai is delighted that since joining the course, she has cut down on the takeaways she had been eating most nights with five-year-old daughter Iamba, and that she now uses the vouchers she recieved to buy fish and organic vegetables. I was getting anything convenient, she says. Leith Walk is so full of lovely takeaways, you can have Chinese one night, then Indian and a chippy another night. I can cook, but this has given me the motivation. Now Ill have one takeaway or maybe none a week.

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