Fall movies feature strong Lehigh Valley connections

The cast includes take a breath Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis, Julianne Nicholson, Dermot Mulroney, Benedict Cumberbatch, Sam Shepard, Ewan McGregor, Margo Martindale and Chris Cooper. Trivia note: Guest is married to costume designer Amy Roth. See below. Todd Hallowell: For the last 35 years, the Pottstown native has worked with Ron Howard in different capacities, including as a production designer and second-unit director. On the Formula One race-car movie “Rush” (Sept. 27), he’s credited as executive producer. “Rush” stars Chris Hemsworth (“Thor”) as the charismatic Englishman James Hunt while Daniel Bruhl plays the disciplined Austrian perfectionist Niki Lauda. Tim Heidecker: Are you ready for “A Friggin’ Christmas Miracle” (December). Heidecker, an Allentown native best known for the Adult Swim TV show “Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!” appears with Robin Williams, Lauren Graham, Joel McHale and Candice Bergen. The plot? A guy (McHale) drives around on Christmas Eve with his dad (Williams) looking for replacement gifts after he realizes he’s lost all of the presents he’s bought for his son. Hey, it could be another “Bad Santa.” Christopher Lennertz: The Easton High School grad does some of the best work of his career as the composer for “Thanks For Sharing” (Sept.

Fall Movie Sneaks 2013

(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times / February 24, 2013) Also By Steven Zeitchik September 18, 2013, 1:26 p.m. Seth MacFarlane may have plenty of reasons to count his millions , but hes had a pretty rough year of it in the media. Last winter he was pummeled for his boob-happy Oscar-hosting turn, which many critics found misogynistic and unfunny. And this week hes been getting dragged through it all over again with the premiere Tuesday night of his live-action Fox sitcom Dads, which, in an unfortunate parallel to the Oscars , has been called racist and unfunny. Thats of considerable interest to moviedom. MacFarlane has two big films coming out over the next 20 months: the comedic western A Million Ways to Die In the West, out in May, and Ted 2, the sequel to the Mark Wahlberg blockbuster that shoots next year and will hit theaters in April 2015. West starring an ensemble cast of MacFarlane, Neil Patrick Harris , Sarah Silverman and Dads Giovanni Ribisi is about a sheep farmer, a duel, a criminal and other genre absurdities. Its a big test for MacFarlane, since it takes him deeper into a new territory and much further from the Family Guy-esque comedy hes known for on TV and was able to smuggle into Ted. Having a strike against you leading up to that film won’t help the cause. FALL TV 2013: Watch the trailers Indeed, the biggest problem for MacFarlane on Dads isnt the offensiveness its that, so far, its not bringing the laughs. Regardless of what you think of the so-called edginess the Hitler video-game jokes, the cancer jokes, the Asian-school-girl jokes that will matter a lot more than whether the show sets off taste alarm bells. As Mother Jones said , The real problem does not lie with any ethnic or racial stereotypes, but with the fact that it is unoriginal and often a painfully unfunny, lazy waste of production space.” Or as the Associated Press put it , “The truth is, viewers who celebrate MacFarlane as well as those who revile him should be equally dismayed by ‘Dads.’ It’s just a mediocre multicamera sitcom, complete with formula humor and unearned laughtrack. FULL COVERAGE: Fall TV preview 2013 The fact is, MacFarlanes yet to prove he can pull off true live-action without quippy computer-generated people or animals. As my colleague Scott Collins asked, “Is Seth MacFarlanes Dads the worst-reviewed show of the season?” But heres why the movies probably won’t take a hit. While TV types like to tout the open-ended advantages of the form compared to the constraints of film, in this case MacFarlane will have a lot more freedom working in cinema. Hes one of the rare commercial directors with heavy sway over the final cut. And the 22-minute multicamera sitcom is about as restrictive as it gets; compared to it, a 100-minute feature offers the malleability and creative freedom of a Tolstoy novel.