Top 20 Concert Tours From Pollstar

A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Better security, mindful artists prevent concert mayhem Patrick Ryan, USA TODAY 10:12 a.m. EDT September 20, 2013 Beyonce is the latest victim of fans overstepping their boundaries at her concerts. Beyonce performs on stage during “The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour” at the Barclays Center on August 3 in New York. She is currently in the midst of the tour’s Latin American leg. (Photo: Kevin Mazur) Beyonce was dragged off stage by a fan at a concert in Brazil last weekend Other pop stars such as Justin Bieber and One Direction have suffered concert attacks It’s key to “let audiences know what their limitations are,” one expert says SHARE 3 CONNECT 8 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE She may be Queen Bey to many, but that doesn’t mean Beyonce is always treated like royalty during her shows. Especially when her throngs of adoring fans are crazy in love. Not only did the pop star’s luscious locks get caught in an electric fan during a July performance, the reigning diva has also been spanked by a Copenhagen concertgoer in May and pulled off stage by another at a Brazil show last weekend (resulting in this hilarious, albeit terrifying, image ). Mrs. Carter’s bad-luck streak may seem like an anomaly (her Latin American tour has continued without incident and stops in Venezuela tonight and Colombia on Sunday), but in fact, these crazed fan incidents happen to nearly every pop star. Concertgoers have rushed the stage at Miley Cyrus , Demi Lovato and Taylor Swift shows. Justin Bieber was attacked by a fan during a Dubai performance, resulting in an upturned piano. Even One Direction’s Harry Styles suffered a blow to the groin after a concertgoer threw a shoe at him in February.

Lead singer Jon "Jonsi" Birgisson of the Icelandic post-rock band Sigur Ros is known for his guitar-bowing technique.

TIMELINE: Walt Disney Hall through the years What’s the coolest part of your job? We take people on tours inside the organ and having the opportunity to see the mechanism, or the strikers when the organ is being played, to see the outside from inside and the blowers, the wind lines, all of this. And it’s so expansive, it’s 40 to 45 feet tall and its weight is so vast. Seeing all that from within is wonderful. How do people react to the view from inside? They’re in awe, even for organists, some have never seen inside their instrument before and when they see it they say, “Wow.” All these different kinds of pipes produce different sounds and it’s fun to show. It’s really great to show and tell in that way. How are you celebrating the organ this year? This is the ninth year for the organ. Next year we’ll celebrate the 10th year and we’ll be able to pull out all the stops for that. What is your favorite piece to play on the organ? I have a few party pieces as I like to call them. I love Bach, all the major parts he writes and as an organist I just love playing them. And I grew up in the church, so many of them are familiar and just comforting to me.

Walt Disney Concert Hall’s organ conservator pulls out all the stops

The stage was adorned with state-of-the-art lighting, a giant video screen and, most intriguingly, dozens of light bulbs on lampstands, providing the feel of a festival or a construction site. Sigur Ros got to work with “yfirboro,” a melancholy track from the new album, “Kveikur,” that creeped in like a fog over a lake covered with the fragile falsetto of frontman Jon “Jonsi” Birgisson that you have to hear to believe. That voice, which sounds amazing and otherworldly on record, is that much more powerful live. Sigur Ros’ live show is getting an electric jolt from “Kveikur,” the most band’s aggressively dissonant record, starting with the industrial thunder of “Brennisteinn,” with distorted synth, Georg Holm’s rumbling bass and the two-drum attack led by Orri Dyrason, who went at his kit with violent intensity. Among those layers of symphonic sound was Jonsi going at his electric guitar with a bow, his normal mode of musicianship. Behind the band was a collection of mostly disturbing art films: bodies sinking lifelessly into water, red lava, alien masked creatures, etc. For all the sound it generates, Sigur Ros is nonetheless a minimalist band that builds its mountains with precision, repetition and simple melodic structures. Pieces like the fiery “Hrafntinna” — with Mr. Dyrason crashing the cymbals, including one his lap — were offset by the icy, gray “Vaka,” which had him playing a spare, heartbreaking piano melody, and “Varuo,” which transformed the female string section into a cathedral choir. Within the first four or five songs, Sigur Ros had shown its hand, and the rest you could say was more of the same. With Jonsi singing in Icelandic and his invented language of “Hopelandic,” he could be singing about his laundry and we wouldn’t know it, so there’s nothing to grab onto there, besides the emotion in his voice.

Rare Nirvana concert footage to air on VH1, MTV to commemorate ‘In Utero’ 20th Anniversary

23. By Margaret Eby / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 4:14 PM Comment Denis O’Regan Krist Novoselic, Kurt Cobain and Dave Grohl of Nirvana in London, 1991. MTV and VH1 announced they would air rare concert footage of the band later this month. Get ready to party like it’s 1993. MTV and VH1 announced on Wednesday rare footage of Seattle grunge gods Nirvana will be released nest week. The footage includes rehearsals and performances filmed as part of “Nirvana: Live and Loud,” a concert at Seattle’s Pier 48. The networks are reissuing the concert in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of their album “In Utero.” STR New / Reuters The footage comes from ‘Nirvana: Live and Loud,’ a concert that originally aired on MTV on New Year’s Eve 2013. Artists.Vh1 and Artists.MTV will premiere clips from the performance first. VH1 Classic will then air the entirety of the footage, including performances of “Heart-Shaped Box” and “Rape Me,” on Sept. 23. The concert will be released on DVD the following day. MTV News is also putting together an oral history of the concert,, complete with commentary from staffers who attended and archival footage of the band. The history will run on the MTV news site.

Concert review: A Standard start for Peter Oundjian and the TSO

People were nevertheless in a festive mood in Roy Thomson Hall and indeed heard some music worth applauding. The main focus of interest was Elgars Cello Concerto as played by Alisa Weilerstein, a 31-year-old American whom Oundjian knew (as he explained in the inevitable preliminary remarks) as the infant daughter of the founding first violinist of the Cleveland Quartet (Donald Weilerstein). She applied a steady vibrato (and dignified expression) to the many lyrical outpourings of this confessional-sounding score and played the rapid figures of the second movement with admirable lightness. Oundjian held orchestra in check so much so that his podium gestures were sometimes needed as a guide to all that too-deep-for-tears tenderness. The concert began (after the traditional rendition of O Canada) more feistily with Brittens Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell, a.k.a. The Young Persons Guide to the Orchestra, happily liberated from its kiddie-concert ghetto. It would be impossible to mention all the worthy solos and ensembles (the former mostly from associate principals) that made up this brilliant performance. Harpist Heidi Van Hoesen Gorton and clarinetist Yao Guang Zhai could be singled out. Violas seemed not quite to have found their characteristic voice. They sounded like big violins. After intermission came Dvoraks Symphony No. 7 in a run-through that needed both more thought and more rehearsal. It was nevertheless possible to admire the warm horn playing, solo and sectional. Perhaps this masterpiece will get its due in the repeat performances of Thursday and Sept. 28 and 29. The Thursday concert will be recorded as was Wednesdays by the CBC.

175477003

(3) Kenny Chesney; $2,571,651; $75.89. 3. (4) One Direction; $1,728,956; $65.83. 4. (New) Beyonce; $1,697,832; $115.14. 5. (5) Phish; $1,590,139; $50.54. 6. (7) Justin Bieber; $1,225,230; $80.77. 7. (8) Dave Matthews Band; $1,220,023; $56.87. 8. (9) Bruno Mars; $1,035,321; $69.75.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.