End-users say that has caused waiting times of more than a year, distorting supplies and inflating physical prices to record highs – especially for aluminium, which is in oversupply. The LME proposed in July that any warehouse with waiting times of more than 100 days be required to link the rate at which it loads out material to the rate at which the facility brings in new metal. The 136-year-old exchange hopes the move will solve the crisis over a policy that has drawn scrutiny from UK and U.S. regulators and ease frustration among industrial users, including beer and can maker MillerCoors LLC and Novelis, which manufactures sheet used to make cans. But the proposal drew a muted reaction at the Metal Bulletin aluminium conference in Geneva this week, as the LME’s three-month industry consultation on the plan draws to an end. The deadline for submitting comments is Sept. 30. “I don’t know if these proposals will work. To my mind, the solution has to be much more simple,” Kevin Moore, president of All Raw Materials Consulting, told Reuters on the sidelines of the conference. “You’ve got to somehow make sure the warehouses do not have a vested interest … Many are saying the traders will find a way to make more money out of the new system,” Moore, a former purchasing manager at General Motors, said. Warehouses with more than 900,000 tonnes are currently required to load out metal at a minimum rate of 3,000 tonnes per day, regardless of how much is delivered into the facility.

Related Stories West Ham United signs 99-year lease to play at Londons Olympic Stadium beginning in 2016 London designers are seeking to entice more demanding fashion followers with luxurious materials, rich embellishment and vivid colors, hopeful that the country’s luxury industry will grow despite continuing global economic woes. London Fashion Week, effectively a trade show that sees hundreds of buyers, journalists and celebrities descend on the British capital, is expected to result in orders worth more than 100 million pounds ($159.35 million) during its September 13-17 run. Hoping to cash in on last year’s London Olympics and the Kate Middleton factor that thrust London in the spotlight – even though the city is a smaller sister to fashion giants Milan, Paris and New York – designers are full of confidence. Despite a noted slowdown in designer-hungry China, many brands still see huge potential there and a rebound in U.S. demand, while Japan is boosting spirits and balance sheets. “I think the customer is still there,” Mulberry Chief Executive Bruno Guillon told Reuters after the luxury label’s spring/summer 2014 womenswear show. “I think the customer is certainly focusing on quality.” Antonio de Moraes Barros Filho/WireImage A model walks the runway at the Temperley London show at London Fashion Week. In a lush garden setting in London’s exclusive Claridges hotel, Mulberry models wore colorful silk floral as well as sparkly sequined dresses, leather T-shirts, dark coats with pony-skin panels and silvery jacquard coats. The British luxury sector is forecast to almost double in size over the next five years, from 6.6 billion pounds in 2012 to 12.2 billion pounds in 2017, according to a Ledbury Research and Walpole Luxury Benchmark study published in July. Fashion contributes 21 billion pounds to Britain’s $2.5 trillion economy, British Fashion Council figures show, and, as the largest employer of all the creative industries, it supports around 816,000 jobs. “British brands developed very well recently – Burberry and Mulberry … stress a lot on British heritage and this is beneficial for the whole British luxury industry,” said Mario Ortelli, Bernstein luxury goods analyst.

London Fashion Week: Luxury designers seek to defy tough markets

The Mulberry Spring/Summer 2014 collection included colorful silk floral as well as sparkly sequined dresses.

LONDON Joe Eszterhas, the scribe behind Basic Instinct, Jagged Edge and Betrayed, is to be this years special guest speaker at the 2013 London Screenwriters Festival (LSF). our editor recommends You’re Fired! Ousted Studio Execs Reveal How They Coped — and What Happens Next Billed as the worlds biggest event for professional screenwriters in film and television, Eszterhas will be the LSFs centerpiece audience interview. Eszterhas said ahead of the event that if he were a young screenwriter starting out today he’d “put my heart, soul, and guts into every word of every screenplay” that he wrote. STORY: Ralph Fiennes, Catherine Breillat and Alfonso Cuaron Lined Up for London Film Festival Events “I would expect to get my heart broken…probably many times. But I would also buy myself a deadly pair of brass knuckles and know how to use them,” Eszterhas said. Eszterhas joins a heavyweight lineup of writers, filmmakers and creative producers including Oscar winning writer/director Jim Sheridan (My Left Foot), Luke Ryan, evp Disruption Entertainment, the banner which produced Guillermo del Toros Pacific Rim and Darren Aronofskys Noah as well as The Cabin in the Woods written by Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard and David Hare, screenwriter of Oscar-winning films The Hours and The Reader. Screenwriters signed to lead sessions include duo Iain Morris and Damon Beesley, screenwriters and exec producers of E4 comedy series The Inbetweenersand cult HBO sitcom Flight of the Conchords and Jeffrey Caine, screenwriter of Goldeneye, The Constant Gardener and Inside Im Dancing. Talent from in front of the camera at the festival is set to include Jodie Whittaker (TV’s Broadchurch, Attack the Block), Reece Shearsmith (TV’s The League of Gentlemen) and Steve Pemberton (TV’s Whitechapel). Festival creative director Chris Jones, who also sports a hat as a filmmaker and author, said the event, now in its fourth year, has grown and “is unparalleled in creating an environment for writers to immerse themselves in the great shared enterprise of making film, television, radio and new media content.” The 2013 LSF at the London School of Film, Media & Performance runs Oct. 25 through 27.